Resources

Showing results 1 - 11 of 11

Author(s)
U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
TC Saves,
Efficiency Maine,
Community Power Works

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on key challenges and opportunities to deploy neighborhood energy programs. Speakers include the City of Orlando, SEEDS, and Research Into Action, Inc.

Author(s)
U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on best practices on upgrades for zero energy ready homes. Speakers include  Florida Solar Energy Center and BIRAenergy.

Author(s)
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA)

This report presents the impact evaluation conducted of the 13 programs in the Southeast Consortium Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP).

Author(s)
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA)

This report provides an independent analysis of the economic performance of SEEA's 13-city, U.S. Department of Energy-funded energy efficiency upgrade consortium from 2010 to 2013. It estimates the net impacts of SEEA's energy efficiency programs on the economy of the southeast region as a whole, and on the economies of the states with participating programs.

Author(s)
Resources for the Future
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Austin Energy

This study looks at evidence of capitalization of energy efficiency features in home prices using data from real estate multiple listing services (MLS) in three metropolitan areas: the Research Triangle region of North Carolina; Austin, Texas; and Portland, Oregon. These home listings include information on Energy Star certification and, in Portland and Austin, local green certifications. Our results suggest that Energy Star certification increases the sales prices of homes built between 1995 and 2006 but has no statistically significant effect on sales prices for newer homes.

Author(s)
North Carolina Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date

This study provides statistically significant analysis that ENERGY STAR qualified new homes sell faster (i.e., fewer days on the market) and for higher prices (i.e., sell for higher prices, or sell for a greater percentage of the listing price, or have a higher price per square foot) than comparable nonqualified homes, providing valuable evidence that there is a market advantage for ENERGY STAR qualified homes.