Resources

Showing results 1 - 10 of 10

Author(s)
Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance,
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA),
Pennsylvania Treasury,
Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA),
Enhabit
The report makes the case for establishment of common data collection practices for energy efficiency lending. The report reviews existing practices for the collection of four categories of data from energy efficiency financing programs: (1) customer data; (2) financial product and performance data; (3) facility-level data; and (4) energy efficiency project data. The report then identifies high-priority needs, characterizes potential uses for finance program data, and identifies use cases that describe how stakeholders use data for key objectives and actions.
Author(s)
U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA)

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on the benefits and challenges of program automation.

Author(s)
Kira Ashby and Hilary Forster, Consortium for Energy Efficiency,
Bruce Ceniceros, Sacramento Municipal Utility District,
Bobbi Wilhelm, Puget Sound Energy,
Kim Friebel, Commonwealth Edison,
Rachel Henschel, National Grid,
Shahana Samiullah, Southern California Edison
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
National Grid,
Southern California Edison,
Puget Sound Energy,
Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD),
Commonwealth Edison Company (ComED)

This paper explores ways in which program administrators are using social norms to spur behavior change and, as a result, curb energy use. In recent years, home energy reports (HER) programs have applied the concept of social norms to the energy efficiency context. These feedback programs inform customers of how their energy consumption compares to their neighbors' and provide other information about their usage, with the goal of enticing customers to change their energy use behavior to improve their relative neighborhood ranking.

Author(s)
Green Madison,
Me2
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Green Madison,
Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2)

Survey for consultants participating in Green Madison and Me2 programs about their experiences with the programs.

Author(s)
Lilah Glick, Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA)
Presentation from the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance on how to conduct a real-time evaluation of programs and services.
Author(s)
Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Green Madison,
Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2)
Example Me2 and Green Madison process evaluation plan to conduct an in-depth investigation and assessment of the major program areas.
Author(s)
Me2
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Green Madison,
Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2)
Survey for people who signed up to participate in the Me2 program for home performance assessments, but ultimately decided not to participate. The goal of the survey is to help improve services for future participants.
Author(s)
Me2
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Green Madison,
Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2)
Participant survey sent to Me2 customers that have completed at least the initial Energy Advocate visit.
Author(s)
U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA)

This peer exchange call summary focused on the challenges and effective combinations of quality assurance strategies.

Author(s)
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy,
University of Cincinnati Economics Center
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA)

This report analyzes the energy efficiency opportunity presented to the greater Cincinnati region. Analysis of the region and the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) programs shows potential energy cost savings, including positive cash flow from energy cost savings that consistently exceed loan payments, for both residential and nonprofit participants. Investment in energy efficiency could make counties more competitive, create jobs, reduce pollution, and help homeowners and nonprofits make cross-cutting building improvements.