Resources

Showing results 1 - 9 of 9

Author(s)
U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Denver Energy Challenge,
Efficiency Nova Scotia,
Energize Delaware,
Watt Watchers,
Empower Chattanooga,
Energy Upgrade California

This presentation includes examples of 16 programs' creative marketing materials.  The Better Buildings Residential Network held a March Madness tournament to find the most creative residential energy efficiency messages during March Peer Exchange Calls. Sixteen marketing campaigns were featured in a bracket challenge on the calls, and participants made their picks. Residential Network member the Fuel Fund of Maryland was chosen as the winning message for its Watt Watchers campaign.

Author(s)
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Vermont Home Energy Challenge,
Efficiency Nova Scotia,
Narragansett EnergyWise,
Cool California Challenge,
San Diego Energy Challenge,
Narragansett Residential New Construction Program

Utilities and regulators increasingly rely on behavior change programs as essential parts of their demand side management (DSM) portfolios. This report evaluates the effectiveness of currently available programs, focusing on programs that have been assessed for energy savings. This report focuses on behavior change programs that primarily rely on social-science-based strategies instead of traditional approaches such as incentives, rebates, pricing, or legal and policy strategies. The objective is to help program administrators choose effective behavior change programs for their specific purposes.

Author(s)
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Keystone Home Energy Loan Program (HELP),
Kansas How$mart,
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA),
Michigan Saves,
Texas LoanSTAR,
Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD),
Nebraska Dollar and Energy Savings Program

This report is a guide to all customer-facing financing products—products offered by a lender directly to a borrower—used to pay for energy efficiency. Intended for state and local governments that are deciding whether to start a new program, tune up and existing program, or create a Green Bank, it provides information on the full range of financing product options for target participants, the tradeoffs of various products, and potential advantages and disadvantages for different types of customers.

Author(s)
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA),
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA),
Energy Right Solutions for Buisness,
Energy Right Solutions for Industry,
Efficiency Nova Scotia,
National Grid Energy Efficiency Program,
Energy Trust of Oregon,
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs,
Enhabit,
District of Columbia Sustainable Energy Utility,
BC Hydro,
Ontario Power Authority Industrial Accelerator Program,
Elevate Energy

Among the many benefits ascribed to energy efficiency is the fact that it can help create jobs. Although this is often used to motivate investments in efficiency programs, verifying job creation benefits is more complicated than it might seem at first. This paper identifies some of the issues that contribute to a lack of consistency in attempts to verify efficiency-related job creation. It then proposes an analytically rigorous and tractable framework for program evaluators to use in future assessments.

Author(s)
The Energy Foundation
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Enhabit,
Keystone Home Energy Loan Program (HELP),
Maryland Clean Energy Center Home Owner Loan Program,
Texas LoanSTAR,
Colorado ENERGY STAR Homes,
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Energy Efficient Mortgage Program,
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) PowerSaver,
Community Preservation Corporation Green Financing Initiative,
New Resource Bank,
Sempra Utilities,
United Illuminating

Reviews and summarize energy efficiency financing models and strategies. Models are analyzed according to funding sources, program structures, limits to scale, repayment vehicles, and project risks. Strategies consider applicable building sectors, models, levels of establishment, growth potential, advantages, and disadvantages.

Author(s)
Climate Solutions
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Hailey's Community Climate Challenge,
EnergySmart,
Eugene Water and Electric Board,
Community Energy Challenge,
Hailey's Community Climate Challenge,
Jackson Hole Energy Sustainability Project,
Knoxville,
TN,
Oberlin Project,
Energize New York,
RePower Kitsap,
RePower Bainbridge,
RePower Bremerton,
Burlington Sustainability Action Team,
Gainesville Regional Utilities,
Hillsboro Solar Advantage,
Issaquah,
WA,
MPower Madison Program,
Solarize Pendleton,
Clear the Air Challenge,
Santa Fe,
NM,
West Union,
IA,
Sustainable Williamson,
CharlestonWISE,
City of Aiken,
SC,
City Green Initiative,
Kilowatt Cruncher Challenge,
Smarter Sustainable Dubuque,
Small Cities Climate Action Partnership,
City of Grand Rapids,
MI,
Town of GreenÞeld,
MA,
City of Keene,
NH,
Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL),
Clean Local Energy Accessible Now,
RichmondBuild Pre-apprenticeship Construction Skills and Green Jobs Training Academy

This report from Climate Solutions analyzes small- to medium-sized American cities that are using successful methods to further clean energy economic development. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners that are featured in the report include Bainbridge Island and Bremerton, Washington; Boulder, Colorado; Bedford, New York; Madison, Wisconsin; and Grand Rapids, Michigan. The report includes details on the how the featured cities funded their projects, found successful models to reach their goals, and to see which new projects are off to a promising start.

Author(s)
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Camden POWER - A Better Buildings Initiative,
Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation (WECC),
Better Buildings Near Eastside Neighborhood Sweeps Program,
Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL),
Keystone Home Energy Loan Program (HELP),
Midwest Energy,
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA),
Opportunity Council,
Wyoming Energy Savers
This policy brief describes the energy efficiency financing options programs can use to help financial institutions make energy upgrades affordable and accessible to homeowners.
Author(s)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Austin Energy,
Bridgeport Housing Authority Energy Efficiency,
City of Pendleton,
OR,
Enhabit,
ClimateSmart Initiative,
Colorado ENERGY STAR Homes,
Connecticut Solar Lease,
Keystone Home Energy Loan Program (HELP),
Long Island Green Homes,
Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program,
Palm Desert Energy Independence Program,
Sonoma County Energy Independence Program,
Sustainable Connections: Energy Challenge,
Texas LoanSTAR

This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency resource is intended to help state and local governments design finance programs for their jurisdiction. It describes financing program options, key components of these programs, and factors to consider as they make decisions about getting started or updating their programs.

Author(s)
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Publication Date
Organizations or Programs
Texas LoanSTAR,
Utah Revolving Loan Fund for Schools,
Rhode Island Energy Revolving Loan Fund,
Ohio Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Fund,
Montana Alternative Energy Revolving Loan Program,
Arizona Energy Loan Program,
Florida Conversion Revolving Loan Program,
Efficiency Kansas Revolving Loan Program,
North Carolina Energy Program
This report provides information for states intending to set up a new revolving loan fund for state energy programs.