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Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2017

The U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Program released version 2.0 of a user-friendly tool for estimating the cost-effectiveness of a residential energy efficiency program based on program administrator inputs. Cost-effectiveness analysis compares the benefits (i.e., outputs or outcomes) associated with a program or a measure with the costs (i.e., resources expended) to produce them. Program cost-effectiveness is commonly used by public utility commissions to make decisions about funding programs or program approaches. Program designers, policy makers, utilities, architects, and engineers can use this tool to estimate the impact of different program changes on the cost-effectiveness of a program.

Author: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date: 2017

This 90-minute webinar explored the topic of linking and leveraging energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE/RE) programs for limited-income households, including the need to coordinate with other energy assistance programs. It presented case studies of organizations that have successfully advanced connections among available programs and funding sources.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2017

The Better Building Clean Energy for Low Income Communities Accelerator (CELICA) offers a list of federal funding and financing resources and technical assistance programs for low-to-moderate income community projects. It is a worksheet for program managers to map out relevant resources for their planning or program needs.

Author: Julie Michals, E4TheFuture
Publication Date: 2017

This presentation discusses E4TheFuture's report, Occupant Health Benefits of Residential Energy Efficiency, which reviews existing research on residential EE measures and associated health impacts, discusses ways that programs can monetize occupant health co-benefits, highlights innovative programs that combine energy efficiency and health-focused home repairs, and identifies research gaps and strategies to help advance and leverage funding across such integrated efforts.

Author: Energize New York
Publication Date: 2017

With project funding from Energize NY PACE and incentives from NYSERDA's Multifamily program, Natlew Corporation was able to make energy efficiency upgrades to their multifamily affordable housing complex in Mount Vernon, NY.

Author: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date: 2017

Energy Outreach Colorado (EOC), an independent nonprofit organization created by the State of Colorado, is a one-stop shop for low-income energy services in the state, including programs for affordable multifamily housing. EOC developed partnerships with a variety of organizations across Colorado, leveraged multiple funding sources, and created new and expanded programs to address gaps in low-income energy assistance. This case study highlights EOC’s key features, approach, partners, funding sources, and achievements, as well as their keys to success and tips for replication and sustainability.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on how organizations can diversify and grow new revenue streams and types of financing approaches used to make resources stretch further and help homeowners finance upgrades. Speakers include Connecticut Green Bank, Sealed, and Craft3.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2016

This paper analyzes Bank of America's $55 million initiative to provide low-cost funding and grant support to advance energy efficiency investment in low- to moderate-income communities. The funding supported community development financial institutions (CDFIs) in developing and enhancing efficiency programs for residential, commercial, and multifamily buildings. We report on loan performance, energy savings, and the degree to which the savings offset the cost of the energy efficiency investment.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2016

This paper analyzes Bank of America's $55 million initiative to provide low-cost funding and grant support to advance energy efficiency investment in low- to moderate-income communities. The funding supported community development financial institutions (CDFIs) in developing and enhancing efficiency programs for residential, commercial, and multifamily buildings. We report on loan performance, energy savings, and the degree to which the savings offset the cost of the energy efficiency investment.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

Capturing the story behind energy savings projects helps catapult a culture around planning future projects, funding them, and growing a team's value in your company or organization. This webcast features media experts giving tips on telling your tale.

Author: Green & Healthy Homes Initiative
Publication Date: 2016

This report identifies sustainable funding sources for asthma-related home interventions. It examines the business case and return on investment for interventions that remedy triggers that can exacerbate asthma.

Author: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc.
Publication Date: 2015

This report represents NEEP’s annual assessment of the major policy developments of 2014, as well as its look into the immediate future, where NEEP gauge states’ progress toward capturing cost-effective energy efficiency as a first-order resource. While looking at the region as a whole, NEEP also provides summary and analysis of some of the biggest building energy efficiency successes and setbacks from Maine to Maryland — including significant energy efficiency legislation and regulations and changes in funding levels for energy efficiency programs.

Author: Affordable Housing Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date: 2014

The intent of the Handbook is to: Encourage energy efficiency design in new construction as well as in acquisition/rehab projects; Showcase the funding sources, programs, incentives, and assistance available to further lower investments in energy efficiency; Overcome owner-developers perception that achieving large energy savings is usually too expensive, time consuming or difficult; Demonstrate design concepts, processes, and practices that will help to minimize the costs of high performance buildings; Highlight the non-energy benefits associated with high performance buildings; Dispel the myth that cheaply built homes are affordable to operate in terms of utility costs; Emphasize that energy efficiency lowers utility bills, thereby enhancing home affordability; Stress that a home that just complies with Title 24 is the least efficient home you can legally build in California.

Develop contractor engagement, quality assurance, and workforce development plans that include strategies, workflow, timelines, and staff and partner roles and responsibilities.

Establish relationships with contractors who will deliver program products and services, and with organizations that train and certify workers.

Solidify your program strategy and decide which customers you will focus on; what products, services, and support you will provide; and how you will partner with contractors and others to deliver services to your customers.

Support and partner with the workforce who will deliver your program’s energy efficiency services by understanding their capacity, recruiting contractor partners, enabling technical training and business development support, fostering clear communication, and refining program processes over time, in partnership with your workforce.

Demonstrating Success and Sustaining Impact
Author: Kelly Lucci, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation
Publication Date: 2014
Presentation, Media

This webcast is part of a three-part series on communications strategies and methods. It focuses on how communities can effectively showcase the benefits and successes of a clean energy initiative to ensure additional funding opportunities, continued engagement, and sustained behavior change.

Communicate pertinent results of evaluations to program staff, partners, and stakeholders.

Identify the right questions to ask, appropriate metrics to collect, and the processes needed to initiate third-party impact and process evaluations.

Communicate the results of your financing activities to internal and external partners.

Develop the procurement, outreach, and loan support resources required to perform your financing activities.

Develop processes, strategies, and procedures to continuously improve your organization’s operations and position in the market.

Publicize benefits and lessons learned resulting from your organization’s success in the market.

Improve your program’s efficiency and effectiveness through regular information collection, assessment, decision-making, adaptation, and communication.

Develop a strategy for communicating program impacts and benefits to key audiences to create and sustain support and engagement.

Establish metrics and measurement strategies for understanding whether you are effectively achieving your program goals and meeting your customers’ needs, while identifying areas that can be improved.

Develop a detailed plan for launching and operating your program that integrates all program components into a process that is customer-friendly and efficient for contractors and other partners.

Develop the necessary materials, tools, and staff capacity to effectively deliver and manage your program.

Solidify your program strategy and decide which customers you will focus on; what products, services, and support you will provide; and how you will partner with contractors and others to deliver services to your customers.

Design a residential energy efficiency program that integrates marketing and outreach, contractor coordination, incentives, financing, and program evaluation to provide customers with the products and services they want through a customer-centric process.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2014

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on new and updated revenue strategies.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This peer exchange call summary focused on bond funding.

Learn about the capabilities and services of existing contractors and training providers working in your market.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on shared funding arrangements with contractors.

Develop evidence-based insights into your program’s performance through third-party process and impact evaluations. Learn how to develop effective data collection strategies and timely evaluations to identify important program achievements as well as opportunities for making program improvements.

Establish an evaluation plan that will allow you to determine how your financing activities are impacting the market.

Develop a plan to implement your financing activities, with defined roles for financial institution partners, contractors, customers, and your program.

Identify and partner with financial institutions that can provide capital, underwriting, and other functions to enable your customers to access financing.

Determine if enhancements to existing financing products or the development of new products are necessary to allow you to achieve your goals and objectives.

Ensure that your program’s customers will have access to affordable financing, so they can pay for the services you offer.

Establish goals, objectives, and timeframes for your financing activities.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This peer exchange call summary focused on lender-based fees and sharing costs with lending partners.

Survey existing and potential demand for energy efficiency products and services based on an understanding of policies, housing and energy characteristics, demographics, related initiatives and other market actors.

Create your organization’s business plan, which describes how your operational and financial structure will support the delivery of energy efficiency services.

Define your business model, including market position, products and services, type of customers, financial model, governance structure, and the assets and infrastructure your organization needs.

Identify and engage organizational partners in your business model design.

Identify your organization's preferred market position by assessing existing market actors, gaps, competitors, and potential partners.  Develop a business model that will allow you to deliver energy efficiency services.

Establish or update your organizational mission, vision, and goals to encompass energy efficiency programs.

Identify and prioritize potential target audiences based on their likely receptivity to your program's services.

Communicate marketing and outreach results internally and to partners.

Decide on priority target audience segments, messages, and incentives that will motivate customers.

Establish specific marketing and outreach goals, objectives, targets, and timeframes.

Author: National Housing Trust
Publication Date: 2013

This guide outlines opportunities and strategies to overcome obstacles preventing utility-sponsored investments in multifamily affordable housing through collaboration between the housing and utility sectors.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on implementing and generating revenue from employer-based programs.

Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs
Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013
Presentation, Media, Transcript

Rather than selecting from two or three fixed models, a successful clean energy finance program will require a sponsor to make a number of design decisions, based on resources available and the needs of the community served. This webinar outlines these key areas for consideration (including potential program sponsors, institutional structure, and potential sources of program revenue) and examples of how organizations across the country have blended design decisions into successful programs.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This peer exchange call summary focused on tracking and using data to support revenue streams.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2013

This peer exchange call summary focused on unique fee-for-service revenues as related to program sustainability.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2012

This peer exchange call summary focused on assessing potential revenue streams.

Author: The Energy Foundation
Publication Date: 2012

Reviews and summarize energy efficiency financing models and strategies. Models are analyzed according to funding sources, program structures, limits to scale, repayment vehicles, and project risks. Strategies consider applicable building sectors, models, levels of establishment, growth potential, advantages, and disadvantages.

Exploring Opportunities for Energy Efficiency as a Revenue Stream in the Forward Capacity Markets
Author: Terri Esterly, PJM Capacity Market Operations; Doug Hurley, Synapse Energy Economics Inc.
Publication Date: 2012
Presentation, Media, Transcript

Webcast on utility forward capacity markets and how energy efficiency programs may access these markets as a potential source of revenues.

Exploring Opportunities for Energy Efficiency as a Revenue Stream in the Forward Capacity Markets
Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2012
Presentation, Media, Transcript

This webcast provides information for energy efficiency programs on the opportunities and challenges associated with participating in forward capacity markets and reliability pricing models as potential revenue streams.

Author: Robin LeBaron, National Home Performance Council
Publication Date: 2012

Presentation about the pro forma to evaluate the impact of program marketing on contractor revenue developed by the National Home Performance Council.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2012

This peer exchange call summary focused on grant funding investments, program design and revenue streams in the post-grant period.

Part I: Getting Started: Answering Big Picture Funding Questions
Author: Neelam Patel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Pat McGuckin, The Cadmus Group, Inc.; Richard Dooley, Arlington County, Virginia; Shawn Collins, Opportunity Council; Alex Ramel, Sustainable Connections
Publication Date: 2012
Presentation 1, Presentation 2, Presentation 3, Presentation 4, Transcript

This webcast (Part I of a three-part series) covers the big picture questions that local governments should consider for funding clean energy programs. What resources are available? What are the program priorities? How can these programs pay for themselves? What funding is available? The webinar guides local governments through these and other questions in the context of their own unique circumstances and illustrates the concepts through case studies that explore how local governments have used both conventional and unconventional methods to gain support, line up partners, and design and implement their funding programs.

Part II: Getting it Funded: Finding Funding for your Clean Energy Programs
Author: Neelam Patel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Pat McGuckin, The Cadmus Group, Inc.; Marvin Lee, School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Nate Boyd, City of Orlando, Florida
Publication Date: 2012
Presentation 1, Presentation 2, Presentation 3, Presentation 4, Presentation 5, Transcript

This webcast (Part II of a three-part series) discusses how climate and clean energy programs can find funding.

Author: National Home Performance Council
Publication Date: 2012

Tool to evaluate contractor impacts on program revenue.

Author: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Publication Date: 2012

Policy brief explaining what constitutes a qualified project under the QECB program.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2012

This peer exchange call summary focused on how programs are devising plans for creating a contractor revenue stream and potential fee structures.

Author: State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network
Publication Date: 2011

This report lays out a national vision for overcoming many of the barriers to comprehensive home energy improvements. The authors review a range of energy efficiency policies and programs, then analyze three funding and policy scenarios to gauge their long-term impacts on the market for home energy upgrades.

Author: Glenn Barnes, Environmental Finance Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Publication Date: 2011

Presentation aimed at program administrators that highlights the elements of an income statement, methods for forecasting costs and revenues, the importance of performance measurement, and potential revenue streams.

Author: Andy Holzhauser, Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance
Publication Date: 2011

Presentation on the organization, funding structure, and market focus of the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance.

Author: Clean Energy Solutions, Inc.
Publication Date: 2010

Presentation describing sustainable revenue sources for local energy alliances.

Author: Environmental Finance Center at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Publication Date: 2010

This market assessment evaluates lending options for funding energy efficiency upgrades in North Carolina.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date: 2009

This guide helps state and local authorities and energy efficiency program administrators choose successful programs in response to energy efficiency program funding opportunities through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. It provides information and lessons learned about ten different types of programs--such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR--across the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors.

Develop processes to evaluate your organization’s strengths, weaknesses, and market position on a regular basis.

Energy upgrades can make homes safer and reduce residents’ health risks. Because energy efficiency programs help improve residents’ quality of life, their missions are consistent with other organizations focused on public health, low-income housing, or local economic development. Following is a sample of how successful residential energy efficiency programs have leveraged the complementary benefits of energy efficiency to create new partnership opportunities and funding sources....

A comprehensive evaluation of over 140 programs across the United States found that more successful residential energy efficiency programs offered multiple training opportunities to contractors, either by delivering training or engaging with local partners to offer training. Providing access to technical, sales, and program training can enhance assessment quality, improve sales, increase the rate of conversion from assessment to upgrade, improve quality control, and contribute to more...