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Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2018

This study provides an overview of practices for quantifying and reporting avoided energy-water costs from demand-side measures. It also summarizes the regulatory guidance for incorporating water savings into cost-effectiveness screening for energy efficiency programs.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2017

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on using tailored messaging and approaches to meet the unique needs of families. Building Doctors is the featured speaker.

Author: Julie Michals, E4TheFuture
Publication Date: 2017

This presentation discusses E4TheFuture's report, Occupant Health Benefits of Residential Energy Efficiency, which reviews existing research on residential EE measures and associated health impacts, discusses ways that programs can monetize occupant health co-benefits, highlights innovative programs that combine energy efficiency and health-focused home repairs, and identifies research gaps and strategies to help advance and leverage funding across such integrated efforts.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2017

State and local governments across the U.S. are focused on how clean energy can help them meet a variety of energy, economic development, and environmental goals. An early step for most energy efficiency planning involves identifying and quantifying energy savings opportunities, followed by understanding how to access this efficiency potential.  This website includes national and state-level energy efficiency potential studies for the residential, commercial, and industrial sector.  It introduces presentations on how building energy codes, city-led efforts, energy savings performance contracting (ESPC), industrial, and ratepayer-funded efforts can support state energy planning. 

How to Influence Utilities to Provide Actionable Energy Data to Multifamily Properties
Author: Institute for Market Transformation
Publication Date: 2017
Media

This webinar covers best practices for providing whole-building data, as well as options building owners and landlords have to influence this process. Multifamily property stakeholders need better information about their energy usage. Arming them with this information enables better benchmarking and energy management practices, and more reliable utility allowance models for affordable housing. Actionable energy usage information allows building owners to make improvements to not only save energy, but also reduce expenses, increase comfort, and lower vacancies.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2017

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call emphasizes the health benefits of upgrades to make your program relevant to potential partners and audiences. Speakers include the City of Fort Collins, Colorado and  Green & Healthy Homes Initiative Greater Syracuse, Home Headquarters.

Author: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc.
Publication Date: 2017

The Regional Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Forum (EM&V Forum) works to support use and transparency of current best practices in evaluation, measurement, verification, and reporting of energy and demand savings, costs, avoided emissions and other impacts of energy efficiency, while also advancing the development of strategies and tools to meet evolving policy needs for efficiency.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2017

This report discusses how information technologies (IT) and communication networks are enabling new ways of tracking and analyzing the benefits of saving energy. Automated data collection and processing, enabled by inexpensive sensors, WiFi networks, and cloud computing, are reducing the time and expense required to determine the value of nonenergy benefits. This report explores new techniques for data gathering and analysis, what they could mean for energy efficiency programs, and how they might impact state and utility policies.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

This summary from a Better Buildings Residential Network peer exchange call focused on communicating non-energy benefits that homeowners and building owners are most interested in. Speakers include Elevate Energy, Green & Healthy Homes Initiative, and Skumatz Economic Research Associates, Inc.

DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Orientation Webinar
Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016
Media, Transcript

The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings, comfort, health, and durability. This presentation provides an overview of the Zero Energy Ready Home program including the business case and how to be recognized by DOE as an industry leader. Builders and energy raters will also learn how to quickly become DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partners and begin qualifying homes.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

This literature review describes what is currently known about the occupant health benefits resulting from residential energy efficiency or work that is consistent with home performance upgrades. Of particular interest are the occupant health impacts associated with work typically conducted by the home performance industry, such as: air sealing and insulation; properly-sized, selected, matched, and installed energy efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; identification and correction of moisture problems; proper whole house and room ventilation; lighting; and additional services including the replacement of appliances; measurement and installation of whole house and room air filtration systems (e.g., air purifiers); and basic pest exclusion. The intent of this literature review is to examine research that assessed work that would not be expected to harm residents or the workers.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

Energy retrofits can harm or help resident health. Beyond preventing harm, this presentation covers how to use energy retrofits as an opportunity to improve the lives of your building residents and the surrounding community. It focuses on different ways that organizations are using energy efficiency to improve their communities through positive health outcomes and job creation.

Author: Low-Income Energy Affordability Network
Publication Date: 2016

This presentation describes non-energy benefits from energy efficiency upgrades in low-income households, draws from research on health and related benefits of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and tailors insights to Massachusetts.

Author: Three3, Inc.; NMR Group, Inc.
Publication Date: 2016

This study assesses and monetizes a sub-set of non-energy benefits experienced by recipients of energy efficiency services residing in income-eligible households in MA, including: reduced asthma; reduced cold-related thermal stress; reduced heat-related thermal stress; reduced missed days at work; reduced use of short-term, high interest loans; increased home productivity due to improvements in sleep; reduced carbon monoxide poisoning; and reduced home fires.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

The benefits of energy efficiency upgrades beyond money and energy savings include non-energy benefits that are often not communicated well. Multiple non-energy benefits include lower home maintenance costs, improved air quality and less sick days for adults and children, greater resiliency, and lower emissions. This presentation covers examples of how your program can fully realize the potential from all of these multiple non-energy benefits.

Author: APPRISE Inc.
Publication Date: 2016

This presentation explains non-energy benefits from residential energy efficiency programs, including those associated with households, ratepayer or taxpayers, and societal benefits. Also presented is a framework for measurement and monetization of health benefits, economic benefits, and environmental benefits (e.g. avoided emissions) and a case study of New Jersey's Clean Energy Program.

Author: Green & Healthy Homes Initiative
Publication Date: 2016

This literature review explores how residential energy efficiency and health interventions can confer positive economic, health, and environmental non-energy benefits at the individual and community level, thereby leading to significant savings while improving the quality of life and resiliency of low income households. The paper closes with policy recommendations to unlock the savings of non-energy benefits from smart energy efficient investments.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2016

Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs provide affordable and accessible financing for home energy efficiency upgrades that improve value, comfort and durability, and create jobs. PACE is a scalable financing mechanism with over 50,000 projects and $1 billion invested in California, and multifamily housing projects in New York and other states. This session discussed successful PACE programs, designs, and FHA's guidance.

Author: Efficiency First California
Publication Date: 2016

This article highlights the importance of communicating to homeowners about the non-energy benefits of energy efficiency improvements such as better comfort, improved indoor air quality, reduced allergies, and a safer, healthy home. It also discussed that non-energy benefits are an undervalued and often overlooked component of energy efficiency upgrades and need to be a part of energy efficiency program's and contractors' sales strategies.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy
Publication Date: 2015

This handbook provides both a strategic planning framework and standard methodologies to determine the energy and non-energy benefits of benchmarking and transparency (B&T) policies and programs that have recently begun to proliferate in jurisdictions across the United States. The intent of this handbook is to provide a simple “how-to-guide” with very clear steps and data requirements for the primary analysis methods recommended for use by local jurisdictions wishing or needing to assess the impacts of their B&T policies.

Author: Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Publication Date: 2015

This report presents results from an analysis of asthma-related health benefits of health and home performance interventions using data collected from 49 households in Northwestern Washington State from 2006 to 2013.

Author: Energy Efficiency For All (EEFA)
Publication Date: 2015

This factsheet highlights the benefits of increasing the energy efficiency of multifamily housing, which saves energy, improves residents' health and comfort. and maintains reasonable rents. This helps families, communities, and affordable building owners.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2015

The benefits of energy efficiency extend beyond energy savings. Homes, commercial buildings, and industrial facilities gain comfort, health, and safety benefits from energy efficiency programs. Additional benefits for businesses include savings on maintenance, materials, and the costs of regulatory compliance. On the supply side, electric utilities enjoy reduced system costs. Focusing on the residential, business, and utility sectors, this report examines each of these multiple benefits, their role in program marketing, and current best practices for including them in cost-effectiveness testing.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2015

The benefits of energy efficiency extend beyond energy savings. Homes, commercial buildings, and industrial facilities gain comfort, health, and safety benefits from energy efficiency programs. Additional benefits for businesses include savings on maintenance, materials, and the costs of regulatory compliance. On the supply side, electric utilities enjoy reduced system costs. Focusing on the residential, business, and utility sectors, this report examines each of these multiple benefits, their role in program marketing, and current best practices for including them in cost-effectiveness testing.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2015

Among the many benefits ascribed to energy efficiency is the fact that it can help create jobs. Although this is often used to motivate investments in efficiency programs, verifying job creation benefits is more complicated than it might seem at first. This paper identifies some of the issues that contribute to a lack of consistency in attempts to verify efficiency-related job creation. It then proposes an analytically rigorous and tractable framework for program evaluators to use in future assessments.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2015

Among the many benefits ascribed to energy efficiency is the fact that it can help create jobs. Although this is often used to motivate investments in efficiency programs, verifying job creation benefits is more complicated than it might seem at first. This paper identifies some of the issues that contribute to a lack of consistency in attempts to verify efficiency-related job creation. It then proposes an analytically rigorous and tractable framework for program evaluators to use in future assessments.

Author: Affordable Housing Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date: 2014

The intent of the Handbook is to: Encourage energy efficiency design in new construction as well as in acquisition/rehab projects; Showcase the funding sources, programs, incentives, and assistance available to further lower investments in energy efficiency; Overcome owner-developers perception that achieving large energy savings is usually too expensive, time consuming or difficult; Demonstrate design concepts, processes, and practices that will help to minimize the costs of high performance buildings; Highlight the non-energy benefits associated with high performance buildings; Dispel the myth that cheaply built homes are affordable to operate in terms of utility costs; Emphasize that energy efficiency lowers utility bills, thereby enhancing home affordability; Stress that a home that just complies with Title 24 is the least efficient home you can legally build in California.

Author: Arkansas Economic Development Commission
Publication Date: 2014

Presents the loan loss reserve guidelines for the Arkansas Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Loss Reserve Program.

Author: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Publication Date: 2014

This tool lets non-experts evaluate county-level emissions displaced at electric power plants by energy efficiency and renewable energy policies and programs.

Communicate program results to contractor partners and workforce development stakeholders.

 Implement contractor coordination and workforce recruitment and training in concert with other program components

Develop contractor engagement, quality assurance, and workforce development plans that include strategies, workflow, timelines, and staff and partner roles and responsibilities.

Develop workforce and contractor engagement procedures, forms, and materials

Establish relationships with contractors who will deliver program products and services, and with organizations that train and certify workers.

Solidify your program strategy and decide which customers you will focus on; what products, services, and support you will provide; and how you will partner with contractors and others to deliver services to your customers.

Support and partner with the workforce who will deliver your program’s energy efficiency services by understanding their capacity, recruiting contractor partners, enabling technical training and business development support, fostering clear communication, and refining program processes over time, in partnership with your workforce.

Establish objectives, targets, and timeframes for your program to support local contractors and the type and quality of service they provide to help meet your program’s goals.

Author: EmPOWER Maryland
Publication Date: 2014

This report analyzes and develops estimates of non-energy impacts that could be included in cost effectiveness analyses for the EmPOWER Maryland energy efficiency programs. Four non-energy benefits are included in this analysis: air emissions, comfort, commercial operations and maintenance (O&M), and utility bill arrearages. In all four cases, a recommended value and methods for including them in future EMPOWER costs effectiveness analyses are provided.

Author: Erin Malone, Synapse Energy Economics Inc.
Publication Date: 2014

This presentation summarizes the non-energy benefits of energy efficiency, and how they can be used to drive uptake of energy efficiency measures. State examples are included.

Communicate pertinent results of evaluations to program staff, partners, and stakeholders.

Identify the right questions to ask, appropriate metrics to collect, and the processes needed to initiate third-party impact and process evaluations.

Identify and implement systems and tools that will support data collection and data quality necessary for effective evaluation.

Communicate the results of your financing activities to internal and external partners.

Develop the procurement, outreach, and loan support resources required to perform your financing activities.

Author: APPRISE Inc.
Publication Date: 2014

This memo provides a review of the New Jersey Comfort Partners Energy Saving Protocols, recommends changes to the calculations and additional calculation protocols for measures not included, and calculates engineering estimates for those proposed energy savings formulas.

Author: Natural Resources Defense Council
Publication Date: 2014

This study is a review of non-energy benefits related to residential weatherization programs. The study estimates the value, in dollar and percentage terms, of non-energy benefits from weatherization programs, and summarizes the ranges and typical values for non-energy benefits. Recommendations for a non-energy benefits strategy for Maryland are provided.

Author: Natural Resources Defense Council
Publication Date: 2014

This study is a review of non-energy benefits related to residential weatherization programs. The study estimates the value, in dollar and percentage terms, of non-energy benefits from weatherization programs, and summarizes the ranges and typical values for non-energy benefits. Recommendations for a non-energy benefits strategy for Maryland are provided.

Author: Elevate Energy
Publication Date: 2014

Multifamily housing retrofits provide a rich opportunity to reap energy efficiency (EE) savings. Despite this opportunity, the multifamily market has not captured investment needed to realize the energy savings, and the affordable housing sector faces additional investment barriers. This paper makes the case for the implementation of energy retrofits in affordable multifamily buildings by presenting the non-energy benefits (NEBs) associated with such upgrades.

Improve your program’s efficiency and effectiveness through regular information collection, assessment, decision-making, adaptation, and communication.

Research and analyze the specific barriers, needs, and opportunities for a residential energy efficiency program in your community.

Develop a strategy for communicating program impacts and benefits to key audiences to create and sustain support and engagement.

Establish relationships with organizations that can help deliver your program by enhancing your knowledge, resources, capabilities and access to customers and contractors.

Solidify your program strategy and decide which customers you will focus on; what products, services, and support you will provide; and how you will partner with contractors and others to deliver services to your customers.

Design a residential energy efficiency program that integrates marketing and outreach, contractor coordination, incentives, financing, and program evaluation to provide customers with the products and services they want through a customer-centric process.

Establish program goals and objectives to clarify what you want your program to achieve and to guide program design and implementation over time.

Author: Elevate Energy
Publication Date: 2014

This paper focuses on how efficiency upgrades affect the financial performance of multifamily buildings. Increasing the energy efficiency of multifamily buildings not only helps owners improve building operation, but also provides a lending opportunity for financial institutions. Energy efficiency program implementers and policy makers who aid in shaping utility Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standards also benefit from understanding the full range of positive effects associated with multifamily energy efficiency improvements. These non-energy benefits (NEBs) can range from improved health to job creation and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

Author: Efficiency Maine
Publication Date: 2013

This case study highlights a 20-unit apartment building that gained energy savings and comfort through Efficiency Maine.

Learn about the capabilities and services of existing contractors and training providers working in your market.

Author: Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance
Publication Date: 2013

This report provides an independent analysis of the job creation impact of DOE's investment in energy efficiency programs, from 2010 to 2013. The analysis calculates the job creation results that would have occurred in the Southeast, based on the prevailing economic conditions from 2010 to 2013, had DOE invested in sectors other than energy efficiency.

Develop evidence-based insights into your program’s performance through third-party process and impact evaluations. Learn how to develop effective data collection strategies and timely evaluations to identify important program achievements as well as opportunities for making program improvements.

Identify and partner with financial institutions that can provide capital, underwriting, and other functions to enable your customers to access financing.

Determine if enhancements to existing financing products or the development of new products are necessary to allow you to achieve your goals and objectives.

Ensure that your program’s customers will have access to affordable financing, so they can pay for the services you offer.

Author: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Publication Date: 2013

This paper describes the changes in indoor environmental quality (IEQ) conditions (air quality and thermal comfort conditions) from health and home performance improvements in 16 apartments serving low-income populations within three buildings in different California climates and seasons.

Survey existing and potential demand for energy efficiency products and services based on an understanding of policies, housing and energy characteristics, demographics, related initiatives and other market actors.

Define your business model, including market position, products and services, type of customers, financial model, governance structure, and the assets and infrastructure your organization needs.

Identify your organization's preferred market position by assessing existing market actors, gaps, competitors, and potential partners.  Develop a business model that will allow you to deliver energy efficiency services.

Establish or update your organizational mission, vision, and goals to encompass energy efficiency programs.

Communicate marketing and outreach results internally and to partners.

Develop a marketing and outreach plan that details your strategies and tactics, workflows and timelines, staff roles and responsibilities, and budget.

Create your program's branding guidelines and materials to elevate program visibility and support your marketing and outreach efforts.

Establish relationships with organizations that will assist with program marketing and outreach.

Decide on priority target audience segments, messages, and incentives that will motivate customers.

Spur consumer demand for your program's services by understanding your target audience and motivating them to act using effective messaging, marketing and outreach tactics, and attractive program offers.

Establish specific marketing and outreach goals, objectives, targets, and timeframes.

Author: Energy Impact Illinois
Publication Date: 2013

This video highlights Steve G. of River Forest, IL sharing his experience of how Energy Impact Illinois helped him improve the comfort and value of his 107 year-old home.

Author: Southwest Energy Efficiency Project
Publication Date: 2012

This report explores the best practices that utilities should undertake in the development and implementation of energy efficiency programs. The report calculates the impact that investing in energy efficiency will have on jobs, household income, and state and regional economies, along with the other public health benefits such as reducing pollution.

Author: Deutsche Bank
Publication Date: 2012

This publication outlines the various benefits of supporting investments in energy efficiency in multifamily affordable housing. Multifamily home energy retrofits ensure the long-term viability of existing affordable housing, support job creation with broad economic impacts, unlock a range of benefits for building residents, and can lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Publication Date: 2012

This report illustrates concrete ways in which energy efficiency has, in recent years, stimulated the creation of direct, indirect, and induced jobs. This report provides examples of job creation that have resulted from energy efficiency by profiling programs, policies, investments, partnerships, and business models that have catalyzed regional increases in employment.

Author: State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network
Publication Date: 2012

This guide provides an introduction to the key issues, practices, and steps for calculating energy savings, avoided emissions, and other non-energy impacts associated with energy efficiency programs.

Author: The Cadmus Group, Inc.
Publication Date: 2012

Pacific Power contracted with The Cadmus Group, Inc., to conduct impact and process evaluations of its Washington low-income weatherization program for the program period extending from March 2009 through February 2011. The impact evaluation assessed energy savings and cost-effectiveness associated with the program, and in doing so quantified select non-energy benefits. The process evaluation assessed program delivery and efficacy, potential bottlenecks, opportunities for improvements, and participants’ experiences and satisfaction with the program.

Author: Climate Solutions
Publication Date: 2012

This report from Climate Solutions analyzes small- to medium-sized American cities that are using successful methods to further clean energy economic development. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners that are featured in the report include Bainbridge Island and Bremerton, Washington; Boulder, Colorado; Bedford, New York; Madison, Wisconsin; and Grand Rapids, Michigan. The report includes details on the how the featured cities funded their projects, found successful models to reach their goals, and to see which new projects are off to a promising start.

Author: Climate Solutions
Publication Date: 2012

This report profiles the early results of a diverse range of small- to medium-sized American cities with different economic and energy profiles that are pioneering the clean energy economy. Many communities used federal grants to jumpstart long-term strategies to test and refine various clean energy and energy efficiency solutions. Others developed innovative financing strategies in the absence of grant money. These city-led efforts to catalyze local clean energy economic development are important to watch as federal grants sunset, especially in the absence of a comprehensive national energy or climate policy.

Author: Stacy Ho and Jeremy Hays, Green For All
Publication Date: 2011

This report highlights the impact of investment for Portland, Oregon in terms of high-quality job creation, equitable hiring, inclusive business opportunities, standardized training, and energy conservation.

Author: Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships, Inc.
Publication Date: 2011

REED serves as a dashboard for the consistent reporting of electric and natural gas energy efficiency program energy and demand savings and associated costs, avoided emissions and job impacts across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region. REED is a project of NEEP's Regional Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Forum (EM&V Forum) and is based on the EM&V Forum's Common Statewide Energy Efficiency Reporting Guidelines.

Author: U.S. Department of Energy

These case studies highlight examples of participating contractors who have employed Home Performance with ENERGY STAR to help homeowners improve their home's comfort and lower their utility bills.

Author: E4TheFuture

To help inform and prompt discussion across a range of audiences on the health co-benefits from residential EE investments, this paper reviews research studies of residential EE and related ventilation upgrades, discusses ways that programs have monetized occupant health co-benefits, and highlights innovative programs that combine EE and health-focused home repairs. The paper concludes with identifying research gaps and strategies to help advance such work.

When it comes to making home energy upgrades feasible financially, ensuring that homeowners understand their financing options is important for converting interest into action. Financing, however, can be a complicated topic, and many programs struggle with communicating its value. Many Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners found success by speaking about financing in ways that resonate with homeowners. Many successful programs have refined their financing messages, focusing on those...

Most residential energy efficiency programs eventually find themselves asking, how can we jump-start our outreach to get better results? Successful programs across the United States have used in-home events to make upgrade benefits visible by showcasing completed projects and actual results. Attending tours of upgraded homes—especially the homes of trusted neighbors and friends—allows potential customers to see and hear firsthand from satisfied customers, talk directly to the...

Energy upgrades can make homes safer and reduce residents’ health risks. Because energy efficiency programs help improve residents’ quality of life, their missions are consistent with other organizations focused on public health, low-income housing, or local economic development. Following is a sample of how successful residential energy efficiency programs have leveraged the complementary benefits of energy efficiency to create new partnership opportunities and funding sources....

Successful residential energy efficiency programs repeat messages often to inform potential participants about program offerings. As marketing gurus note, most people need to be exposed to a message at least three times times and on separate occasions before taking action. The more time between communications, the less likely the customer will follow up on your program offerings. Some programs achieved repetition by coordinating their marketing strategies with partners; potential customers...

Residential energy efficiency programs have found their marketing efforts are more successful when they craft their messaging to resonate with specific customer needs. A comprehensive evaluation of more than 140 programs across the United States found that programs had greater success when they identified and segmented primary target audiences within their target area and tailored outreach to those populations. ...